More Federal Red Tape: Disclosing Corporate Ownership Details Under the Corporate Transparency Act

More Federal Red Tape: Disclosing Corporate Ownership Details Under the Corporate Transparency Act

The Corporate Transparency Act (CTA), recently passed by the U.S. Congress to combat money laundering and criminal activities, imposes stringent reporting—disclosure—requirements on certain businesses, termed “Reporting Companies.” Under the CTA, Reporting Companies must disclose details about their owners—formally known as  beneficial ownership information (BOI)— to FinCEN, a bureau of the United States Department of the Treasury. Non-compliance with the CTA can lead to severe civil and criminal penalties, including imprisonment for up to two years.

Surprising Court of Appeal Decision Concerning Paternity Leave

Surprising Court of Appeal Decision Concerning Paternity Leave

Every once in a while, a court issues a surprising decision. Such is the case with a recent decision involving paternity leave. In a recent case, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals determined that a father was not legally entitled to take paternity leave under the Federal Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”) before the birth of his child.

Cybersecurity and Data Breach Preparedness: Safeguarding Your Digital Assets

Cybersecurity and Data Breach Preparedness: Safeguarding Your Digital Assets

In today’s digital world, cybersecurity threats are diverse and increasingly sophisticated. From phishing attacks that deceive users into divulging sensitive information to ransomware that encrypts data for extortion, these threats pose significant risks to organizations and individuals alike. Understanding these threats is essential for implementing effective cybersecurity measures.

Snap Inc. Settlement: Potential Insights into Future Legislation for Fair Employment Practices and Pay Equity.

Snap Inc. Settlement: Potential Insights into Future Legislation for Fair Employment Practices and Pay Equity.

Snapchat’s parent company, Snap Inc., (“Snap”) has agreed to pay $15 million and make significant changes to its employment practices following accusations of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation against women. The settlement with the California Civil Rights Department (CRD) is significant because it required the company to go beyond what state laws currently mandate, potentially providing insight into future legislation

OSHA’S PROPOSES HEAT BAN: WHAT EMPLOYERS SHOULD KNOW

OSHA’S PROPOSES HEAT BAN: WHAT EMPLOYERS SHOULD KNOW

On July 2, 2024, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) unveiled a significant proposed standard aimed at safeguarding workers from heat hazards across various industries, marking the first federal initiative of its kind. If finalized, the standard would apply broadly, requiring nearly all employers to implement a Heat Injury and Illness Prevention Plan (HIIPP).

Non-Competes and End Runs Around Non-Competes

Non-Competes and End Runs Around Non-Competes

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued a final rule barring most existing and future non-compete agreements. Traditionally businesses have tried to use non-compete agreements to prevent the unauthorized disclosure or misuse of proprietary business information (such as trade secrets). In light of these developments, businesses are encouraged to explore alternative ways of protecting their sensitive information, such as strengthening intellectual property rights through patents, trademarks, copyrights, and nondisclosure agreements (aka: NDA’s) as viable substitutes for traditional non-compete agreements

PAGA REFORMS

PAGA REFORMS

In November 2024, Californians were scheduled to vote on a “PAGA Repeal Initiative,” which, if enacted, would replace the current Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA). Known colloquially as the “Sue Your Boss Law,” PAGA has incentivized employees to file lawsuits against employers on behalf of the State of California to seek “civil penalties.”

DOL Announces New Overtime Exemption Rule: Employers to Comply Beginning July 1

DOL Announces New Overtime Exemption Rule: Employers to Comply Beginning July 1

On April 23, 2024, the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) released a final rule on overtime exemption. This final rule will increase the minimum salary amount required to be paid to executive, administrative and professional (“EAP”) employees to be considered exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) overtime pay requirements.